The Etowah Indian Mounds, the Coosawattee Foundation and Georgia Educational Programs present:
HISTORY ADVENTURE
at the Etowah Indian Mounds
March 21-23, 2017 / grades 2, 4 and 8  
cost $12 per student / title 1 discount / some scholarships available
For information or reservations call 770-313-0519 (see program descriptions below)

Immerse your students in history at the Etowah Mounds in Cartersville with an interactive curriculum-based program. Professional living historians, Native Americans and archaeologists create compelling presentations on Georgia History (2nd and 8th grades) and early U.S. History (4th grade) for an unforgettable learning experience. 

Second Grade History Adventure, March 21
The Georgia Colony: James Oglethorpe, Mary Musgrove and Chief Tomochichi  
Students meet the founder of the Georgia colony and explore the reasons why Georgia was so special among the original colonies. Oglethorpe's translator, Mary Musgrove, tells of her experiences in the world of Creek Indians and in the world of the colonists. Of course, the Georgia colony would not have survived without Chief Tomochichi, who became Oglethorpe's close friend. Students hear from Tomochichi about their travels and experiences together. Oglethorpe, Musgrove and Tomochichi will be presented as three different stations.
Sequoyah and the Cherokee Syllabary
Meet the man who gave the Cherokee Indians a written language. Portrayed by a Cherokee Indian in this program, Sequoyah is a hero full of determination who was able to lead his people to a new way of communicating. Students recite the Cherokee syllabary, learn how it was created, and hear about the life of an extraordinary man.
Native American Dance
Second graders see symbolic dances and learn about their meaning and the unique relationship native people have with their environment. Dancers engage students in participating in dances.
Tour of museum and film
Students explore the Etowah Mounds museum with an archaeologist and see artifacts that are unique to this site. They also see the original film The Southeastern Indians in the museum's theater. Teachers may also wish to walk to the river with their students and to climb to the top of a mound for a view of the village site from above.

Eighth Grade History Adventure, March 22
Hernando DeSoto
Without understanding the impact of this explorer on the Native Americans of Georgia it is impossible to have a complete understanding of Georgia's history. DeSoto's 1540 expedition and his contact with various groups, including the inhabitants of Etowah, set a precedent for the destruction and violence that would erupt between native people and Europeans.  
Creek Indian Hunting Camp
The Native Americans of Georgia became active traders with the Europeans, who set up forts and trading posts. Students enter an elaborate Creek Indian hunting camp where they see and touch trade items such as furs, beads, cookware, clothing and more. They learn about the impact this trade had on the environment and culture of the native people.
Colonial Georgia with Mary Musgrove
Instrumental in making the Georgia Colony a success, Mary Musgrove served as interpreter and adviser to Oglethorpe. Students learn about the threats faced from the French and Spanish as Oglethorpe struggled to bring stability and prosperity to the Georgia Colony, they hear stories of Chief Tomochichi and his friendship with Oglethorpe and they gain a sense of the uniqueness of the Georgia Colony.
Revolutionary War in Georgia
Students encounter a soldier who explains the sources of animosity between the British and the colonists, including the Stamp Act and other measures to extract taxes from the colonists. Georgia's role in the Revolution and the major figures involved become part of the story of independence.
Sequoyah and the Trail of Tears
A seminal figure in Native American history, Sequoyah not only created a written language for the Cherokee Indians, but he was active in the politics leading up to Indian Removal and the Trail of Tears. Students will understand this period from a crucial and personal perspective.
Tour of museum and film
Students explore the Etowah Mounds museum with an archaeologist and see artifacts that are unique to this site. They also see the original film The Southeastern Indians in the museum's theater. Teachers may also wish to walk to the river with their students and to climb to the top of a mound for a view of the village site from above.

Fourth Grade History Adventure, March 23 
Early Natives
Students meet a Native American woman and discover how native people lived before the arrival of Europeans. They learn about customs and beliefs and experience many aspects of material culture. She engages students in ceremonies that help them understand the values and perspectives of the early inhabitants of North America.
Spanish Explorers
Students meet a Spanish explorer and learn about early exploration in North America. What did the explorers believe they would find? What did they bring with them? How did they interact with Native Americans?
Creek Hunting Camp
Students step into a camp set up by a Creek Indian for hunting and for trading with Europeans. They see and touch the items that are being traded and learn about the early exports from the New World back to Europe. 
Revolutionary War 
Students meet a soldier from George Washinton's army and learn about what led up to the Battles of Lexington and Concord. Students come away with a personal understnding of why the Revolutionary War was fought and what the patriots believed they were fighting for.
Native American dance
Our Native American dancers demonstrate dances for fourth graders, explain their meaning and have students participate. Students learn how dances from this region differ from those in other parts of the country and why.
Tour of Museum and Film
Students explore the Etowah Mounds museum with an archaeologist and see artifacts that are unique to this site. They see a film,The Southeastern Indians, in the museum's theater. Teachers may also wish to walk to the river with their students and to climb to the top of a mound for a view of the village site from above.

The History Adventure will be offered again in the fall of 2017. Please check back for details about the October 18-20 and October 24-26 programs.